Another Year After the Abrogation of Article 370

Another year has passed since India abrogated Article 370 and ended Jammu and Kashmir’s special autonomous status, turning it into an annexed and federally-controlled territory. Since then, the restless region has seen continued human rights violations, demographic changes, and a push to delimit the territory in order to allow Assembly elections to take place. India claims it is providing economic development and promoting democracy in Jammu and Kashmir when in fact it continues to breach international law. India’s attempt to show the valley as one where Kashmiris are finally reaping the dividends of peace is a smokescreen for a region where everything is far from normal. This article will analyse India’s actions in the past year and argue that despite Modi’s attempt to hide what is going on from the international stage, India’s continued clampdowns and authoritarianism in Jammu and Kashmir must not go unnoticed.

Investigating and Prosecuting Foreign Terrorist Fighters under Pakistani Law

The phenomenon of Foreign Terrorist Fighters (FTFs) became a significant part of the international discourse in 2012, with the inflow of foreign fighters in Iraq and Syria to join the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria “ISIS” (also known as Islamic State of Iraq and Levant, or Daesh). In response to the threat posed by FTFs, Security Council Resolution 2178 was passed under binding Chapter VII powers, which urged member states to “ensure that their domestic laws and regulations establish serious criminal offences sufficient to provide the ability to prosecute and to penalize in a manner duly reflecting the seriousness of the offense”.

New Money Laundering Threats in the Wake of COVID-19

Although the Covid-19 pandemic has brought the world to a halt, it has concomitantly boosted the criminal economy by creating unprecedented circumstances, easily exploitable by a few. This piece aims to highlight the financial vulnerabilities that have been created due to the Covid-19 pandemic, while briefly discussing the potential safeguards against the exploitation of such vulnerabilities, as suggested by FATF—the global money laundering and terrorist financing watchdog.